St Gregory the Great Summer Garden Party – Oxford

When the PTA of St Gregory the Great School in Oxford decided to hold a Garden Party to raise funds for the school, they invited the Connect2 CAFOD group at Corpus Christi Parish in Oxford to attend to tell people about the their work supporting the people of Sebeya, in Ethiopia.

St Gregory the Great School summer garden Party 2017

> Find out about Connect 2 and about Sebeya

And alongside stalls selling burgers, cream teas and cakes, the Connect2 group sold Ethiopian Food made by parishioners from recipes on the CAFOD website, alongside display boards telling stories of the Sebeya Community, and copies of a prayer by Sebeya Parish Priest, Abba Solomon.

Ruth Derbyshire and Judith Fitzgerald are served by Claire Lama

Parishioner Claire Lama ladled out the food of falafels, green bean stew and spicy tomato salad to hungry party-goers, together with Defo Dabo* (a mild spicy bread) and Honey Yeast Bread*, followed by a fruit salad made from fruits likely to be available in Ethiopia – and the bowls quickly emptied!.

>>  Get the recipe for the Defo Dabo (a mild spicy bread) and Honey Yeast Bread

Face-painted customers enjoyed the fruit salad

3 year old Caspian enjoys Honey Yeast Bread

Claire also had a large atlas of the World and pointed out the location of Sebeya, near to the ancient city of Adigrat, close to the Eritrean border, to parents, teachers and children making it an educational as well as a delicious meal.

Parish Priest of Corpus Christi, Canon Mervyn Tower, who is also a governor of the school, said, “It is good to see the role of CAFOD, and its links with communities around the world, being brought to the wider school community.”

The Parish has been involved with the Connect2 project for two years and is close to reaching its target of £7000 to donate to CAFOD, which would be the amount required to pay for the irrigation system which is currently under construction.  In this way, the Parish will have played a part in bringing more reliability to the crop production in this arid region of Ethiopia, which is prone to severe drought and starvation.

>> Sign up to Connect 2

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s