Remembering Loved Ones

Our third annual Memorial Mass was held on Friday 24 November at St Anthony’s Parish in Wolverhampton.

Mem Mass1Thank you to everyone who joined us at our diocesan Memorial Mass on Friday evening, held to remember and give thanks for all those who have supported CAFOD’s work – through volunteering, prayer, campaigning or donations – and who have made our work possible.

We are very grateful to volunteer Trevor Stockton, who organised the Mass and led the parish music group. Thank you also to Mgr Mark Crisp and Fr David Lloyd for celebrating our Mass and to St Anthony’s for hosting us.

Mem Mass2

Our Book of Remembrance was on display and included the names of all those we remembered and prayed for. Their memory will live on in the lives of all those who have been touched by their kindness and generosity.

Join us in prayer and sign up to receive our weekly reflections

 

Celebrating Oscar Romero

Phil MSchool Volunteer Phil Mayland reflects on his visit to St John Fisher Catholic College, Newcastle under Lyme to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the birth of Blessed Oscar Romero.

St John Fisher Catholic College, Newcastle under Lyme, held a Mission Day on Thursday 20th July, to study and reflect on the life of Blessed Oscar Romero. Each Year Group focused on a particular aspect of Romero and El Salvador, and spent time preparing for an outdoor Mass on Friday 21st July.

The school invited visitors from CAFOD and Missio to lead students in their preparation with each year group preparing specific parts of the Mass. Jo Boyce of CJM Music rehearsed the music with the school’s musicians and practiced the singing with all the students on Thursday. I was asked to work with Year 9 students, who prepared bidding prayers inspired by the life of Blessed Oscar Romero.

RomeroOther year groups worked with the  Art, Technology and English departments in designing Romero Crosses, creating large Murals depicting Romero and El Salvador and writing prayers and poetry.

St John Fisher1.JPG

Mass was celebrated the following day. Fr Paul McNally, the school chaplain, concelebrated Mass with Fr Rob Taylerson and Fr Anton Madej. This was a very special occasion attended by the whole school and invited guests and was a fitting and memorable way to end the academic year.

St John Fisher2.JPG

Join us at our Retreat on 18 November in Solihull to explore how Romero’s life and faith can inspire and transform our world. 

The Wood of the Cross

Lamp Cross photo2

The Lampedusa Cross

Signs and symbols are important. They carry memory of times and places of significance. They tell a story.

During a massive air raid on the city of Coventry in November 1940, the medieval cathedral was destroyed, the wooden rafters of the root collapsing in the fire that ensued. Only the outer shell of stone walls remained.

In the days that followed, hundreds of nails that secured the roofing beams were collected from the floor, later to be formed in to Crosses of Remembrance and distributed world wide. Out of an act of war came an act of forgiveness and memory.

In our own time something similar has occurred. During the last three years we have heard countless stories of loss, of refugees lost in the Mediterranean as their over-loaded ships broke up and sank.

An island off the south coast of Italy became a place of landfall for those who somehow survived, drifting ashore on timber from the wrecked boats. Lampedusa became known for the care it gave to so many. It was visited by Francis very soon after his election to the See of Rome when he celebrated the Eucharist in a field near the Island’s port. It was his first visit outside of Rome as Bishop. He spoke with the people during his sermon saying “We have become used to other people’s suffering, it doesn’t concern us, it doesn’t interest us, it’s none of our business!” Yet, of course it is. His altar on that occasion was constructed from an old fishing boat painted in Italy’s red, green and white national colors.

Their journey had arisen from persecution and poverty in their homelands. They were willing to risk all for a better, safer future for their families. Caring for them within the EU became a huge task, for while some countries offered help and hospitality, others were reluctant to accept an influx of immigrants.  The immensity of the task was overwhelming giving rise to considerable anxiety and confusion.

One man decided to help in a small yet significant way. He was a resident of Lampedusa, a carpenter by the name of Francesco Tuccio.  As the drift wood from the wrecked boats came ashore with the tide, he began collecting the torn and splintered material, peeling paint work revealing the original natural wood. From this salvage he began fashioning simple crosses, leaving the original scarred finish from the time at sea.

Pope Francis carried one of the Tuccio crosses at the memorial Mass to commemorate people who had died. Those who survived the Crossing were also given one as a sign of hope.

In consequence of the work of Francesco Tuccio, CAFOD distributed one of the Crosses to every Cathedral in England and Wales. It was when visiting the parish of St Gregory in Stratford-on-Avon recently that I saw one of these crosses stood on the sanctuary during mass, a silent icon of memory and hope.

The British Museum in London has also received a Lampedusa Cross made from pieces of a boat that was wrecked off the coast of Lampedusa, on 11 October, 2013. The British Museum web site records that ‘…the cross piece retains scuffed blue paint on the front, upper and lower surfaces. The front of the vertical section has layers of damaged paint. The base coat is dark green which was covered with a beige colour then painted orange. The sides and back are planed down to the timber surface. There is a small hole for suspension on the back of the vertical near the top. A fragment of an iron nail survives at the top in the right side of the cross piece. The back of the cross piece is signed F. Tuccio, Lampedusa’

It measures some 38 cm in height and 28 cm in width. .

The text further notes that ‘Mr Tuccio kindly made this piece for the British Museum to mark an extraordinary moment in European history and the fate of Eritrean Christians. It also stands witness to the kindness of the people of the small island of Lampedusa who have done what they can for the refugees and migrants who arrive on their shores’

Like the cathedral in Coventry, the island of Lampedusa has marked tragedy with a gift made from wreckage, the left-over materials from conflict. Those small gifts from both locations have been offered round the world as tokens of memory to help with peace and reconciliation between peoples.

The twisted nails from the burnt roofing timbers of the cathedral, the wasted wooden remains of broken boats, each in their own way form a gift of hope. They are small tokens which carry immense meaning that we shouldn’t ignore and must not forget.

Find out how you can stand in solidarity with refugees worldwide.

By Chris McDonnell (this article appeared in the Catholic Times, Friday July 21st 2017)